NEWS RELEASE 12/11/08

FASB Issues FSP FAS 140-4 and FIN 46(R)-8, Disclosures by Public Entities (Enterprises) about Transfers of Financial Assets and Interests in Variable Interest Entities

Norwalk, CT, December 11, 2008—The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) today issued FASB Staff Position (FSP) FAS 140-4 and FIN 46(R)-8, Disclosures by Public Entities (Enterprises) about Transfers of Financial Assets and Interests in Variable Interest Entities.  The document increases disclosure requirements for public companies and is effective for reporting periods (interim and annual) that end after December 15, 2008.

The purpose of this FSP is to promptly improve disclosures by public entities and enterprises until the pending amendments to FASB Statement No. 140, Accounting for Transfers and Servicing of Financial Assets and Extinguishments of Liabilities, and FASB Interpretation No. 46 (revised December 2003), Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, are finalized and approved by the Board.  The FSP amends Statement 140 to require public entities to provide additional disclosures about transferors’ continuing involvements with transferred financial assets.  It also amends Interpretation 46(R) to require public enterprises, including sponsors that have a variable interest in a variable interest entity, to provide additional disclosures about their involvement with variable interest entities. The FSP also requires disclosures by a public enterprise that is (a) a sponsor of a qualifying special-purpose entity (SPE) that holds a variable interest in the qualifying SPE but was not the transferor of financial assets to the qualifying SPE and (b) a servicer of a qualifying SPE that holds a significant variable interest in the qualifying SPE but was not the transferor of financial assets to the qualifying SPE.

This FSP can be accessed at www.fasb.org.

 


About the Financial Accounting Standards Board

Since 1973, the Financial Accounting Standards Board has been the designated organization in the private sector for establishing standards of financial accounting and reporting. Those standards govern the preparation of financial reports and are officially recognized as authoritative by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Such standards are essential to the efficient functioning of the economy because investors, creditors, auditors, and others rely on credible, transparent, and comparable financial information. For more information about the FASB, visit our website at www.fasb.org.